DESTINATIONS

COASTAL CALIFORNIA

Coastal Southern California reveals an amazing dichotomy of scenic shoreline contrasted by vibrant communities. The coastal regions offer sandy beaches, beautiful coves, rugged cliffs and mountain ranges rising from the sea… 

Cities and towns of all sizes and types dot the coast and inland areas. From quaint beach towns to suburban communities to urban metropolises, Coastal California is a land of contrasts.

 

 

Orange County, located midway between Los Angeles and San Diego…

Los Angeles or “L.A.” …Los Angeles is a huge metro area with a vast diversity …from the beautiful coastal mountains of Malibu to the plush … of Beverly Hills to the inner-city slums of downtown L.A. ….Los Angeles is a sample of everything in America

Catalina Island is Southern California’s offshore hidden gem. Accessible by ferry from both the L.A. and O.C. areas, the island lies about an hour into the Pacific.

CARIBBEAN

The Caribbean is the ultimate tropical island paradise, with its beautiful white sand beaches, majestic palm trees, inviting crystal clear waters, gentle ocean breezes and endless sunsets… 

Travelers from around the world flock to this popular cruise and vacation destination to partake of its idyllic beaches, water sports, eco-tourism, and unique island lifestyle. 41 major islands and literally thousands of smaller ones all beckon with diverse landscapes consisting of mountains, tropical rain forests, rocky shorelines, nearly barren flatlands, active volcanos, and lush plantations where sugar cane, bananas and coffee are grown.

Within this backdrop of natural beauty is a land very rich in culture due to the wonderfully diverse mix of its peoples. Descendants of the original Amerindian tribes, the early European settlers, the African slaves, and arrivals from the nearby Latin countries, live and work together alongside modern day transplants. This fusion reveals itself in Reggae music, flavorful island cuisine, colorful creative arts, and historical reminders of the past. The area is very rich in history, as European explorers arrived to claim islands as their own and then battled each other for control over the centuries. To this day, each island retains its own special character, charm, and personality based on its particular European country heritage.

Today, the Caribbean remains a collection of mostly impoverished and underdeveloped countries and possessions, with the predominant people group being of African descent. Pockets of modernization do abound, and the islands have an interesting mix of modern world business persons, retirees, and tourists of American and European descent.

Purpose Bound has been very selective in choosing the Caribbean overall and the particular islands that are a part of its experiences. If you have a heart for mission work in places like Africa, Haiti or other underdeveloped locales, the similarities of the Caribbean islands visited by Purpose Bound make for the ideal training grounds. From a Christian perspective, portions of the Caribbean are very lost with many needs. Between the dominant impoverished native culture and the primarily pleasure-seeking travelers and transplants from the modern world, there are plenty of opportunities to be a “light”.

The Caribbean is also a land sometimes ravaged by fierce weather, earthquakes, other natural disasters and disease, creating many physical needs. Most are familiar with the humanitarian issues on the larger islands like Haiti, Dominican Republic and Jamaica due to the extensive news coverage when problems or disasters strike. Relief and aid flood those areas as good folks see the media coverage of these causes of the moment. Yet in the shadows of this outpouring, the smaller islands often seem overlooked and many needs remain. It is those that Purpose Bound will mostly address.

There’s a reason the U.S. Virgin Islands are the Caribbean’s most popular destination. Home to St. Thomas, St. John, and St. Croix, these islands embody everything Caribbean. Scenic white sand beaches. Colorful island culture. Water sports. Captivating history. And the comfort, security, proximity, and ease of access as a United States possession. Simply stated, USVI is an ideal starting point for a Purpose Bound adventure. Pictured: Trunk Bay, St. John 

Where We Sail

St. Thomas is the starting point for Purpose Bound’s core spiritual retreat voyages. Following arrival at the island’s modern airport, you’ll immediately experience third world culture as you shuttle through downtown Charlotte Amalie to our dock. Your sailing journey begins as you set sail for your first island destination, quaint Cruz Bay on St. John.

Our Mission Work

We partner with local churches and other organizations on this island to serve on projects like these:

Orphanage and foster care home
Homeless shelter & soup kitchen
Kid camps & VBS
Elderly care home
Misc. community service projects

Local Sights & Activities

Our visit includes time to experience local culture, explore history and partake of popular island activities such as:

Tour of 1672 Fort Christian
Hike to Sugar Plantation Ruins
Driving Tour of St. John
Tour 1833 Synagogue & Museum
Water Sports

The British Virgin Islands, or “BVI” to its followers, is a world-renowned island sailing paradise. The three main islands of Tortola, Virgin Gorda and Jost Van Dyke are each unique destinations. The string of smaller islands along the Sir Francis Drake Channel shields the entire area from the stronger currents of the Atlantic Ocean to the east, while offering natural beauty and water recreation options. When you see photos of a lone sailboat, anchored in a scenic cove with a white sand beach and mountain behind it, there’s a good chance it was shot in the BVI. This area provides the perfect setting for Purpose Bound participants to reflect and contemplate. Or to simply relax on a hammock on a quiet stretch of sand, drifting off to the sound of the never-ending lapping waves. Pictured: Long Bay, Tortola

Where We Sail

Our time in the BVI begins with a brief stop in West End Tortola for customs and a glance at Pusser’s Landing. We circle Tortola, with stops at bustling Road Town and beautiful Cane Garden Bay. Our visit to Virgin Gorda includes The Baths and Spanish Town. We also visit Norman Island and breathtaking White Bay on Jost Van Dyke, and more.

Our Mission Work

We partner with local churches and other organizations on this island to serve on projects like these:

Orphanage and foster care home
Elderly care home
Kid camps & VBS
Misc. community service projects
Prison

Local Sights & Activities

Our visit includes time to experience local culture, explore history and partake of popular island activities such as:

Snorkel an 1867 Shipwreck
Visit “The Baths”
Explore Spanish Town
Kayak or Windsurf
Hike to Copper Mine Ruins

St. Martin is another highly popular destination for Caribbean travelers, with its beckoning white sand beaches and unique island flavor. Many wonder why this island has two spellings: St. Martin and St. Maarten. Actually, this island is home to two distinct countries, one with French heritage and the other with a Dutch background. The cultural differences become very apparent as one crosses from one side of the island to the other. St. Martin is a beautiful island, but one with a mistaken identity. There are certainly pockets of luxury, with exclusive resorts, hillside villas, yachts and other signs of affluence. But a closer look beyond the travel brochures reveals an island that is very underdeveloped and impoverished. St. Martin thus offers Purpose Bound participants some special serving opportunities. And its close proximity to Anguilla and St. Bart’s makes it an ideal base for exploration of those special islands. It also serves as the gateway to various other islands to the southeast that Purpose Bound visits on its longer trips. Pictured: Anse Marcel, St. Martin

Where We Sail

Our journey to St. Martin includes stops on both the Dutch side and the French side. St. Martin’s proximity to Anguilla makes that island an ideal sunset cruise for some of our voyages. St. Barts is a several hour sail from St. Martin, making for a great day trip, including a sail-by to idyllic Ile Fourchue.

Our Mission Work

We partner with local churches and other organizations on this island to serve on projects like these:

Orphanage
Foster care home
Kid camps & VBS
Misc. community service projects
Immigrant School

Local Sights & Activities

Our visit includes time to experience local culture, explore history and partake of popular island activities such as:

Hike Nature Preserve
Tour 1767 Fort
Visit a Tropical Rain Forest
Explore Historical Buildings
Learn to Windsurf & Sail

According to Antigua’s locals, this island paradise boasts 365 distinct beaches along its coastline of coves and natural harbors. Whether that’s true or not, the island definitely has its share of idyllic white sand beaches and other natural beauty. A former British colony, Antigua also has a rich history, as it served as the British Royal Navy’s eastern Caribbean headquarters during the 17th and 18th centuries. Famed Admiral Horatio Nelson was stationed there for a time, and Nelson’s Dockyard and the Shirley Heights fortress overlooking and protecting it, are well-preserved reminders of the battles men fought over possessions. As night falls over the island, a very unique “whistling” sound from the local tree frogs combines with the waves lapping against the boat to make for a very peaceful night’s rest. Pictured: Jumby Bay, Antigua

Where We Sail

We arrive on Antigua through the well-known English Harbour, home to Nelson’s Dockyards and the Shirley Heights overlook. Depending on the service projects on your voyage, we either circle the island by boat, or use island vehicles, to visit the island’s main town of St. John and other smaller villages and beach areas.

Our Mission Work

We partner with local churches and other organizations on this island to serve on projects like these:

Orphanage and foster care home
Elderly care home
Kid camps & VBS
Misc. community service projects
Human condition tour

Local Sights & Activities

Our visit includes time to experience local culture, explore history and partake of popular island activities such as:

Tour 1743 Nelson’s Dockyard
Visit Shirley Heights Overlook
See “Devil’s Bridge” Natural Blowhole
Visit Betty’s Hope Sugar Plantation
Water Sports

ANGUILA

Anguilla lies just several miles off the northwest coast of St. Martin, making it an enjoyable evening sunset sail for select trips that include St. Martin. It is a sparsely inhabited and quiet island known for its pristine white sand beaches and relatively flat landscape. Though there is little commercial development, the island has a distinct French cultural flair to it. Pictured: Shoal Bay

 

ST BARTS

St. Barts is a small island that boasts beautiful white sand beaches and a picturesque countryside. Lying just 15 miles southeast of St. Martin, it is known as the most affluent island in the Caribbean, as many of the “rich and famous” choose this island as their private retreat. It creates an interesting dichotomy when compared to the more underdeveloped islands. Pictured: Gustavia Harbour

 

ST. KITTS

St. Kitts, located 40 miles south of St. Martin, is a beautiful island with a large inactive volcano rising in the island’s center. The island’s rich history is revealed in sites like the Brimstone Hill Fortress and a narrow gauge railway built in 1910 to serve the sugar plantations. On the desolate southeastern peninsula, wild monkeys are often seen along its main access road. Pictured: Brimstone Hill Fortress

 

NEVIS

Nevis is the sleepy sister island to St. Kitts, lying only about 2 miles to the southeast. Charming Charlestown is one of the best remaining examples of colonial architecture in the Caribbean. Alexander Hamilton was born there in 1757, and a museum now occupies his homestead. Many visitors hike to the 3,232′ summit of Nevis Peak, a dormant volcano. Pictured: Caribbean’s First Non-Segregated Church (1824)

 

MONTSERRAT

In 1995, a long-dormant volcano erupted on the tiny island of Montserrat, burying the capital city of Plymouth under mounds of lava and volcanic dust. This natural wonder is still very active, and the entire southern half of the island is a restricted area. The damage from the volcano can be seen from sea or onshore viewing areas. This island is about 30 miles southeast of Nevis. Pictured: Montserrat Volcano Eruption

 

ST. EUSTATIUS (“STATIA”)

Statia, lying about 8 miles northwest of St. Kitts, is a tiny island that is the remnant of a long dormant volcano. It is a Dutch possession inhabited by fewer than 4,000 people. Statia is known for its great snorkeling and rain forest hiking trails. Though tiny, this island played an important historical role as a trade center during U.S. revolutionary war times. Pictured: Statia Panorama

 

SABA

Saba is a tiny island situated about 30 miles northwest of St. Kitts. The island has only one road, aptly named “The Road”. It also has one black sand beach, but is mostly known for its hiking trails and as an underwater snorkeling and diving paradise. Saba’s rugged terrain was originally settled by farmers and fishermen. The island is now a Dutch possession. Pictured: Saba from the Ocean

 

FUTURE DESTINATIONS

In addition to the islands on this page, Purpose Bound intends to add other islands to its trip itineraries in the future. Like the others on this page, these islands can currently be made part of a custom trip:

-St. Lucia (pictured)
-St. Vincent & the Grenadines
-Dominica